Archive for June, 2009


Since I have decided to blog for a bit, I want to talk about the pJira (aka public Jira). From the wiki, the name Jira is apparently a play on the Japanese word for Godzilla. Why Gozilla? Well, there was bugzilla. Yes, we techno-dweebs have a nasty habit of picking the most inane names for our pet projects. Nonetheless, this post is not about the history of the JIRA, whether or not it is a decent bug tracking system, etcetera. Rather, it is about the way the Jira is being used by Linden Lab.

Linden Lab has two Jiras actually—one for internal use and the other for resident bug reporting and feature requests. The external Jira is referred to as the pJira. The process is fairly straight forward. Residents can create new issues and/or comment and vote on existing issues. At first glance, one might even think the pJira is great.

Well… perhaps not.

Residents can also reclassify and close issues that they do not own. And, if you, as a resident disagree and reopen and/or reclassify “your” issue, you stand the very real chance of facing temporary or even permanent banning.

Which brings me to the next bit…

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Last Updated on Thursday, 29 October 2009 10:11

I had planned to play code warrior today. Alas, said plans were quickly derailed. And instead, I ended up installing WordPress and setting up what will probably be a mostly empty blog. Because…. interestingly (or perhaps, not so), a rather curious title appeared in my SL feeds: Linden Giving Away MOTD Space?

The aforementioned article, penned by Prokofy Neva, has unsurprisingly caused quite a stir. As it seems Linden Lab is now providing advertising service to selected residents via the “Message of the Day” (MotD) splash screen that briefly appears during login. They claim this is but “a test” of course. And though Linden Lab representatives say they are attempting to provide a richer, yet predictable, “user experience” to all residents, they have regularly engaged in repeated unpredictable and erratic behavior.

Whether its perma-banning people because they simply do not like them, or buying out two of the largest SL commerce sites on the web, only to put one out of business and break the other beyond recognition, or releasing a new viewer whose graphics are worse than they were in 2005, or penning inept blog posts about messaging… These together not only support the nay-sayer’s contentions but are beginning to erode the confidence of some of the more devout second lifers.

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Last Updated on Thursday, 29 October 2009 10:11